Local Area

Wairakei Golf + Sanctuary is situated in the Wairakei Tourist Park which is an extraordinary geothermal area just north of Taupo township. Cultural experiences, bubbling mud and hot pools are a major attraction for visitors to the Taupo region, and Wairakei Golf + Sanctuary is one of the most popular golfing destinations in New Zealand.

The course is located a stones throw from the mighty Waikato River so that the roar of the powerful Huka Falls can almost be heard, and around its borders plumes of superheated steam can be seen rising through mature forest.

To the East rolling farmland extends to a skyline dominated by another extinct volcano Mt Tauhara.

This area is known as the Central Volcanic Plateau and for good reason. Lake Taupo was formed by one of the biggest volcanic eruptions known to man, and to the South Ruapehu and Ngauruhoe are still live volcanoes.

Maori culture is alive and well in this region. The local Iwi, Ngati Tuwharetoa are a powerful tribe who are vibrant and active in the community. The Pouwhenua pole carving in the entrance way to the course was designed and built locally by members of the Iwi.

Local Area

Wairakei Golf + Sanctuary is situated in the Wairakei Tourist Park which is an extraordinary geothermal area just north of Taupo township. Cultural experiences, bubbling mud and hot pools are a major attraction for visitors to the Taupo region, and Wairakei Golf + Sanctuary is one of the most popular golfing destinations in New Zealand.

The course is located a stones throw from the mighty Waikato River so that the roar of the powerful Huka Falls can almost be heard, and around its borders plumes of superheated steam can be seen rising through mature forest.

To the East rolling farmland extends to a skyline dominated by another extinct volcano Mt Tauhara.

This area is known as the Central Volcanic Plateau and for good reason. Lake Taupo was formed by one of the biggest volcanic eruptions known to man, and to the South Ruapehu and Ngauruhoe are still live volcanoes.

Maori culture is alive and well in this region. The local Iwi, Ngati Tuwharetoa are a powerful tribe who are vibrant and active in the community. The Pouwhenua pole carving in the entrance way to the course was designed and built locally by members of the Iwi.